Ghost Wars
Conversations / October 13, 2017

I checked out “Ghost Wars” episode one on SyFy and my reaction is, “meh.” The whole plot is one guy having the ability to see and speak with spirits. He is viewed as an outcast from the whole town and he attempts to leave. He is unable too, due to being trapped, for some reason. Additionally, people start dying in the town and their spirits are also trapped within. Per IMDB, the summary is, “A remote Alaskan town that has been overrun by paranormal forces and local outcast Roman Mercer (Jogia) must overcome the town’s prejudices and his own personal demons if he’s to harness his repressed psychic powers and save everyone from the mass haunting that’s threatening to destroy them all.” The main characters is played by Avam Jogia. I recognized him from the show Victorius, when my kids watched it. The main characters ghost girl friend is played by Elise Gatien. I was also surprised to see the singer Meat Loaf in it. Interestingly, the main character has a female ghost friend that he communicates with. I found some similarities between this story line and my own book I wrote last year, Sight and Sound. Like my book,…

Wisdom of the Crowd vs Bias
Conversations / October 5, 2017

There is a recent show coming out this fall titled Wisdom of the Crowd. Essentially the show captures the idea of crowd-sourcing the public to submit information through their smartphones in the hopes to be part of criminal capture.   A tech innovator creates a cutting-edge crowd-sourcing hub to solve his own daughter’s murder, as well as revolutionizing crime solving in San Francisco. (IMDB, 2017) This idea is not necessary new, as police have utilized social media and other avenues of technology to assist them in their job of hunting bad guys. While I haven’t had time to watch this yet, I suspect it will be more about ‘see something say something’ ideology. Thank you Janet Napolitano. We continue to spiral in a world where most would flip out their smartphone to record for YouTube over assisting victims. An interesting article discusses how the average of the wisdom of the crowd guessed the weight of an ox within 10 pounds. The result was the idea of a collection of the whole is better data than the expert of one. Way back in 1906, the English polymath Francis Galton visited a country fair in which 800 people took part in a…