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Wisdom of the Crowd vs Bias

There is a recent show coming out this fall titled Wisdom of the Crowd. Essentially the show captures the idea of crowd-sourcing the public to submit information through their smartphones in the hopes to be part of criminal capture.

 

A tech innovator creates a cutting-edge crowd-sourcing hub to solve his own daughter’s murder, as well as revolutionizing crime solving in San Francisco. (IMDB, 2017)

This idea is not necessary new, as police have utilized social media and other avenues of technology to assist them in their job of hunting bad guys. While I haven’t had time to watch this yet, I suspect it will be more about ‘see something say something’ ideology. Thank you Janet Napolitano.

We continue to spiral in a world where most would flip out their smartphone to record for YouTube over assisting victims.

An interesting article discusses how the average of the wisdom of the crowd guessed the weight of an ox within 10 pounds. The result was the idea of a collection of the whole is better data than the expert of one.

Way back in 1906, the English polymath Francis Galton visited a country fair in which 800 people took part in a contest to guess the weight of a slaughtered ox. After the fair, he collected the guesses and calculated their average which turned out to be 1,208 pounds. To Galton’s surprise, this was within 1 percent of the true weight of 1,198 pounds. (TechnologyReview, 2014 Jul 14)

More fascinating to me is it turns out that if a crowd offers a wide range of independent estimates, then it is more likely to be wise. But if members of the crowd are influenced in the same way, for example by each other or by some external factor, then they tend to converge on a biased estimate.  (TechnologyReview, 2014 Jul 14) This bias climate can be seen recently with the shootings in Las Vegas, when reporters told the witnesses only one shooter, rather than listening to what those on the ground had to say.

Meriam Webster defines crowdsourcing as the practice of obtaining needed services, ideas, or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people and especially from the online community rather than from traditional employees or suppliers.

This is quite effective as most people today would leave their wallet at home, over their smartphone. Again, the new show is merely a reflection of what is already occuring.

  • Hatari project enables citizens of Nairobi to submit and share reports on locations of criminal activity  and corruption. Visitors to the site can openly, or anonymously share their own experiences as victims of crime, in addition to the reporting of incidents and also receive alerts to crimes committed in their area. All information is shared via text messaging, as well as web postings and messages via social media such as Twitter.
  • Police in Bristol, England are using Facebook and the internet to track down the killer of 25 year old architect Joanna Yeates who went missing on Friday 17th December 2010. Joanna’s body was found on Christmas Day. The Avon and Somerset Constabulary’s website and Facebook page contain a map of Joanna’s movements prior to her disappearance.
  • Postacrime.com, Spotcrime.com, and CrimeReports all rely on tips from the public for information on all types of crimes committed, although Postacrime only focuses on instances of property loss and damage.
  • The Seattle Police Department already have their own Twitter account with over 7,000 plus followers keeping track of the goings on in their city as well as tweeting vital information to help police in their investigations. They have now established a new initiative to tackle car crime, called Get Your Car Back.  All reports of stolen cars are posted to this designation, including full details of the vehicle’s registration, colour, make and model. Followers who receive the tweet alerts call 911 when they recognise a stolen vehicle.  Although it is too early to tell just how effective the move is proving to be, Seattle PD’s goal is to reduce the number of thefts between 10 and 20 percent.
  • In 2014 a new app called LEEDIR (Large Emergency Event Digital Information Repository) help police use smartphones as tools to gather evidence. (AP, 2014 May 2)

Those against this type of usage fear all this data is over reach of privatization. Additionally, it subjects innocent people to police scrutiny and does not provide “good evidence”. Personally, I feel Big Brother is getting assistance from it’s slaves.

“There’s a reason that we pay professionals to work in police departments,” said Nate Cardozo, a civil liberties attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

People are passionate about being in the community , and will willingly contribute and may not realize they are being exploited by the company,” Moffitt explained.

Whats your thoughts on this topic? I would love to hear it.

References:

IMDB. (2017). Wisdom of the Crowd. Retrieved from http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6522758/

TechnologyReview. (2014 Jul 14). Forget Wisdom of Crowds; Neurobiologists reveal the wisdom of the confident. Retrieved from https://www.technologyreview.com/s/528941/forget-the-wisdom-of-crowds-neurobiologists-reveal-the-wisdom-of-the-confident/

AP. (2014 May 2). New app lets police crowd source evidence. Retrieved from http://nypost.com/2014/05/02/new-app-lets-police-crowd-source-evidence/

Ancient Technology in Hoysaleswara – Lathe

 

The temple Hoysaleswara found in India is dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. The construction of the temple was started in 1120 and completed in 1150. While the temple was created in 30 years, the fascinating thing about this particular temple is ‘how’ it was created. The how continues to baffle historians, due to the intricacies of design. With the evolutionist world view, it would baffle many. However, with the understanding of ‘nothing new under the sun’, it is easy to explain.

The temple is 900 years old. It predates automobiles and other current technologies. It is found in Halebeedu, Karnataka, India. It is one of the largest temples dedicated to Shiva.

 

Shiva

 

Shiva duty is to destroy all the worlds at the end of creation and dissolve them into nothingness. Shiva holds a skull that represents samsara, the cycle of life, death and rebirth. Samsara is a central belief in Hinduism. Shiva himself also represents this complete cycle because he is Mahakala the Lord of Time, destroying and creating all things. It should be noted that the statue of Shiva is found at CERN.

 

Backdrop

Considering we were still using horse and buggy up until the first automobile creation in 1893, technology, for the most part, was rudimentary. Evolutionists hold the idea man was dumber in the past, and we are involving as time goes on. That world view would require no technology or advanced intellect in the past. The temple Hoysaleswara contradicts that theory.

 

Findings

However, a look into the temple Hoysaleswara speaks differently. Take a look at the stone pillars in the temple. Notice they are created by a lathe tool. This would require not only a large impressive machine to rotate these large pillars but the technology to lathe them.

 

 

Today, we use a similar technology in shaping metal via lathe.

One of the gods holds a tool, much like today’s gears.

This tool consists of 32 outer gears, with intricate inner gears. Perhaps this is the tool used to lathe the monumental pillars in the temple.

This same type of tool is used today.

 

This is just one look at how ‘ancient technology’ was merely lost and regained during the last 300 years. I point out Ecclesiastes 1:9,

What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.

 

The bigger question is, why has technology resurfaced again, and what does that mean?

I propose the following:

  • We are not getting smarter, as evolutionist desire, rather we are reintroduced with lost knowledge.
  • This technology is provided to us by other means than natural selection.

 

#AuthorMattCole

Wonder Woman 2017 – Sumerian and Ottoman

 

Recently my son and I watched the new 2017 Wonder Woman (WW) movie. During the movie, the scene of Dr. Poison having a notebook containing two languages peeked my interest. The scene indicated she needed the book, and it appeared she was attempting to decipher it to a point. To me, she was attempting to resurrect an old forgotten technology. This happened to be a powerful gas poison.

However, the point is, there is nothing new under the sun. Ecclesiastes 1:9 tells us, “What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun.” There has been a lot of discussions recently on YouTube regarding the forgotten technology of the ancients, being resurfaced.

I found it fascinating we see this same glimpse in WW.

Ottoman and Sumerian

 

[Picture from http://mostlydeadlanguages.tumblr.com/post/163173770183/the-sumerian-cuneiform-in-wonder-woman]

The site mostly dead languages provide us the above picture and additional insight on the actually written notebook.

Now, here are the things that I feel pretty confident asserting:

  1. The notes are indeed a mixture of two languages.  Based on my difficulty extracting meaning from the cuneiform alone, I suspect that both are necessary for an accurate translation.

  2. The cuneiform is in the Neo-Assyrian (NA) script.  While this script was never used for writing Sumerian, it is the most standardized and simplified version, and (more importantly) it’s the most widely published version of the time.

  3. The cursive is an alphabet (or abjad) in the Arabic family, but it’s not Arabic itself, as evidenced by letters like چ (ç).

  4. “Ottoman” is not a language, but Ottoman Turkish and Persian were both used in the Ottoman Empire, and both of them had alphabets that contain چ.  As I’m utterly unfamiliar with Turkish and Persian, and only marginally familiar with Arabic cursive, that’s the most I can narrow it down.  Regardless, given that Steve was literally on assignment in Turkey, it’s very surprising that neither he nor the cryptographers recognized the script. [Source]

     

Diana Queen of the Amazons

We are told Diana was molded from a lump of clay and the god Zues brought her to life. This hearkens back to the Living God creating Adam from dirt.

Genesis 2:7 Then the LORD God formed a man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being.

Diana is the daughter of Zeus and a human. She is bestowed with godlike powers, “Beautiful as Aphrodite, wise as Athena, swifter than Hermes, and stronger than Hercules.” Essentially a demigod or super human at the very least.

 

This cross between a god and human is the Nephilim. The Nephilim (“fallen ones, giants”) were the offspring of sexual relationships between the sons of God and daughters of men in Genesis 6:1–4.  I wrote a similar post in regards to Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2, where again we see the main character being a Nephilim.

So again the entertainment industry in 2017 circles back to the beginning of the Bible in Genesis 6:4.

 

#AuthorMattCole

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